The Bridge of Chains

Miguel Angel Victoria Fotógrafo

The Bridge of Chains (in Hungary and officially, Széchenyi lánchíd) of Budapest is the oldest of the bridges that link the two cities Buda and Pest, which today make up the capital of Hungary.
From the structural point of view it is a suspension bridge, in which the main cables have been replaced by stiff links of string. Its central vein is 202 meters, it was one of the longest in the world when it was inaugurated. It is one of the most known bridges on the Danube River.

The Bridge of Chains is the symbol of Budapest and also the first permanent bridge in the Hungarian stretch of the Danube and the second one in the entire course of the river.

History
The Bridge of Chains is the symbol of Budapest and also the first permanent bridge in the Hungarian stretch of the Danube and the second one in the entire course of the river.
Before its existence, travelers crossed the River, important corridor, by ferry, although at the beginning of the 15TH century there was a temporary pontoon bridge over the river. In the winters the frozen Danube could be crossed by foot or horses car. But when it started melting, there was no connection between the two river banks.
The count Esteban Szhenyi had to wait a whole week in 1820 until he found a navigator brave enough to take him from Pest to Buddha among the floating ice sheets. It was then when he offered his income of a whole year to build a permanent bridge over the river.
There were existing plans for this already from the end of the 1700’s taking as a model the bridge of Carlos in Prague, with several pillars of support. However, later on, they opted for another solution technique. Count Széchenyi saw in London the bridge of Hammersmith, a bridge suspended over the Thames designed by the engineer William Tierney Clark, to which he entrusted the preparation of the plans of the first Hungarian permanent bridge.

The execution of the bridge was entrusted to the Scottish engineer Adam Clark, whose last name coincides with the English engineer, in whose honor has been named the small square that is immediately at the exit of the bridge, of the side of Buddha.

The execution of the bridge was entrusted to the Scottish engineer Adam Clark, whose last name coincides with the English engineer, in whose honor has been named the small square that is immediately at the exit of the bridge, of the side of Buddha. The works began in 1839 and it was inaugurated on November 20, 1849. Those that came to the bank of the river from the bridge had to make completely go around the Palace Hill.
At the end of the Second World War German troops blew up the bridge, along with the other four of the city in its withdrawal before the siege of Budapest by Soviet troops. The reconstructed bridge was inaugurated on November 21, 1949, celebrating the first centenary of its construction.
Since its construction, this bridge has been the most representative symbol of Budapest. Its photo is an essential element in the presentations on Hungary and Budapest. It has been represented in many stamps, tickets, and Hungarians coins, for example in 2009 when it appeared on the two hundred florins coin.

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Little Planet

Bridge of strings in Budapest, Hungary
Bridge of strings in Budapest, Hungary

Photo Gallery

Panoramic photography

Bridge of strings in Budapest, Hungary
Bridge of strings in Budapest, Hungary

How this Virtual Tour was made

The equipment used to perform virtual tour are the following:

  • Nikon D810 DSLR Camera
  • Lens Sigma 8 mm Fisheye
  • Nodal Ninja NN4 Tripod Head
  • Manfrotto 190 Carbon Fiber Tripod
  • Remote Switch

The software processing of the image was

  • Lightroom to process RAW files
  • PTGui for stitching images
  • Photoshop general and local settings
  • PanoTour Pro for generating virtual tour
While doing these virtual tours we found out about a legend that says that the architect who constructed the bridge believed that this one was so perfect that he said that if someone found
an imperfection he would kill himself, and a child found it and said: if you look you will see that at the entry of the bridge there are two lions, and neither of them has a tongue.
In fact, the lions are cats and not dogs, that’s why when panting they do not show its tongues. And they do have tongues, but they are hidden behind the fangs.

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Licencia de Creative Commons
El Puente de las Cadenas by Miguel Angel Victoria is licensed under Licencia Creative Commons Reconocimiento 4.0 Internacional . Created from the artwork retrieved from https://s3.amazonaws.com/sinaloa360/puente-de-las-cadenas/index.html. You can find more permissions under this license in https://www.sinaloa360.com
Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Traducción al idioma inglés realizada por la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa a través del Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán. English language translation made by Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa through the collaboration of Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán

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