Mexican Flag Day in Culiacan, Sinaloa

Miguel Angel Victoria Fotógrafo

The Mexican Flag, as a national symbol, dates from the time of the Independence War. In ancient Mexico, the Aztecs, Tlaxcalans and Tecpanecas made use of banners, creating the tradition that still survives.
During the Colony period, Mexico was known as New Spain and had no own emblem; the vice regal government used the banners and coats of arms of the kings of Spain.

At the beginning of the insurgent struggle, Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, after giving the Cry of Independence in the town of Dolores, Guanajuato. As it passed through the town of Atotonilco, in the sanctuary, he took a banner with the image of the Virgin of Guadalupe and used it as the flag ofthe Insurgent Army.
The army of Jose Maria Morelos, who on the death of Hidalgo resumed the Independence movement, used a banner with the image of the Virgin of Guadalupe and had an eagle in the center. It was the first representation, in an emblem, of the founding icon of Gran Tenochtitlan.

Between 1812 and 1817, a group of cavalry of the forces of the insurgent generals Guadalupe Victoria and Nicholas Bravo used the first tricolor flag that had the letters SIERA.

Between 1812 and 1817, a group of cavalry of the forces of the insurgent generals Guadalupe Victoria and Nicholas Bravo used the first tricolor flag that had the letters SIERA.
The 24 of February of 1821 the Plan of Iguala was proclaimed which would lay on the bases to end the war and obtain the independence; it was adopted as a representative flag of the three guarantees movements to be raised by the Trigarante Army.
This flag consisted of three diagonal stripes and three colors that symbolized at that time the central ideals of the independence movement: the white, the Catholic religion; the green, the independence, and the red union of the Spaniards, creoles and mestizos to the libertarian impulse. Its accomplishment was entrusted by Agustín de Iturbide to the tailor Jose Magdaleno Ocampo, neighbor of Villa of Iguala.
When the independence was consummated, on September 27, 1821, Vicente Guerrero and Agustín de Iturbide, at the head of the Trigarante Army, entered with the flag raised to the City of Mexico.
After the signing of the Act of Independence, Agustín de Iturbide was emperor of Mexico and officially decreed, as emblem of the first empire, a vertical striped flag with the colors green, white and red, in the center of which was a crowned eagle perched on a nopal it is considered the first formal antecedent of our country school.

At the fall of empire Iturbide, in 1823, a ruling Triumvirate decreed a law stating that the flag should be tricolor: green, white and red, with the eagle without crown and surrounded by branches of oak (fortress) and laurel (victory).

At the fall of empire Iturbide, in 1823, a ruling Triumvirate decreed a law stating that the flag should be tricolor: green, white and red, with the eagle without crown and surrounded by branches of oak (fortress) and laurel (victory). Since then the position of the eagle has been changing. It has been front, profile and three quarters; His head looking a few times to the left and others to the right. This had a meaning, the Liberals drew it with their heads to the left; The Conservatives, looking to the right. During the Mexican Revolution of 1910, each of the revolutionary groups had its flag with its own shields: Madero, Zapata, Villa and Carranza. In 1916, President Venustiano Carranza, tried to put order in the design and use of the shield, decreeing that it would take the eagle that appeared in the indigenous codices, representing the foundation of the City of Mexico. On September 20 of that year he announced a law that would represent the eagle in the left profile, perched on a nopal and devouring the snake. As of this decision of the constitutional government of Carranza, the regulations for the use of the flag were perfected; In 1934, President Abelardo L. Rodríguez issued a decree by which both the eagle and the serpent were modified in a more modern design; Later the 1968 decree of Gustavo Diaz Ordaz. On February 8, 1984 President Miguel de la Madrid published in the Official Gazette of the Federation the National Coat of Arms, Flag and Anthem Act, currently in force. The General Archive of the Nation and the National Museum of History guard a model of the National Flag authenticated by the three powers of the Union.
ASTA MONUMENTAL FLAG OF THE PARK CONFLUENCE IN THE CITY DEVELOPMENT “TRES RIOS” (three rivers).

Monument built inside the Tres Ríos Project initiated by the governor Francisco Labastida Ochoa, rescuing, urbanizing and putting to the service of the population the lands of the right margin of the river Tamazula.

Monument built inside the Tres Ríos Project initiated by the governor Francisco Labastida Ochoa, rescuing, urbanizing and putting to the service of the population the lands of the right margin of the river Tamazula; Continuing along both banks of the Humaya River, now known as Las Riberas Park. The Monumental Flags are a set of large Mexican flags located throughout the country. They are part of a program initiated in the year 1999 under the mandate of the ex-president of Mexico Ernesto Zedillo. The flags are one of the largest in the world raised on masts.
They are manufactured by the Ministry of National Defense. The site chosen for this monument is a strip of land, in the form of a peninsula, formed by the union of the Humaya and Tamazula Rivers, this river called the Batacudea by the indigenous Tahuans at time of the arrival of the Spaniards.
This site has a symbolic character, is the geographic center of the territory of Sinaloa, from where the history of the foundation of the Villa of San Miguel de Culiacán radiates by the Spanish conquistador Nuño de Guzmán on September 29, the day of San Miguel, Year 1531. Culiacán is the
capital of the state of Sinaloa.
The chroniclers talk about the fact that in pre-Hispanic times it was a ceremonial center and place of concentration of merchandise, a sort of market, where goods and services were exchanged among the natives of the Tahue Nation. Its location and the monumental features of the flagstaff make up a dignified site where our country flag is proudly flying to the pride of the city. It also has monumental, illuminated and musical juxtaposed fountains where the public can enjoy lights and sounds presentation at night. Here he is honored by the Ordinance every year on February 24, when Mexicans and Sinaloans commemorate National Flag Day.
The flag is one of our three Patriotic Symbols and catalytic element of the unit of the people of Mexico.
COMPONENTS AND DIMENSIONS
A steel mast of 13 sections of 75 mts, long, nailed to a concrete base of 12 mts; He had measured 1.32 m in diameter at the base and 0.40 m in diameter at the tip. The pole reaches a total height, including a lightning rod and lighthouse, of 77.60 mts. The mast has a weight of 40 tons. It is able to sustain waving a flag of 37.5 meters long and 21.42 meters of height with a weight of 100 kgs. In different cities of Mexico exist flags monumental flags of more than 100 mts of height, standing out those that are in the Zocalo, in the Military School and in the Field Mars in the City of Mexico.

Lic. Jaime Félix Pico

Texto: Lic. Jaime Félix Pico

Cronista y Promotor Cultural

Little Planet

Mexican Flag Day in Culiacan, Sinaloa
Mexican Flag Day in Culiacan, Sinaloa

Gallery Photo

How this Virtual Tour was made

The equipment used to perform virtual tour are the following:

  • Nikon D810 DSLR Camera
  • Lens Sigma 8 mm Fisheye
  • Nodal Ninja NN4 Tripod Head
  • Manfrotto 190 Carbon Fiber Tripod
  • Remote Switch

The software processing of the image was

  • Lightroom to process RAW files
  • PTGui for stitching images
  • Photoshop general and local settings
  • PanoTour Pro for generating virtual tour

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Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Traducción al idioma inglés realizada por la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa a través del Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán. English language translation made by Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa through the collaboration of Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán

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