Next to Brühl’s Terrace and directly on the side of the Fraunkirche Church, the old Royal Academy of Fine Arts, built in 1984, is located. It is found next to one of the three buildings which are currently part of the Superior School of Visual Arts in Dresden. The building was built on Brühl’s Terrace by Constantin Lipsius between 1887-1894. The glass dome is famous for its shape and it is known as the Lemon Squeezer The building was built on Brühl’s Terrace by Constantin Lipsius between 1887-1894. The glass dome is famous for its shape and it is known as the Lemon Squeezer. The parts destroyed during World War II have been restored and rebuilt since 1991. The Brühl’s Terrace houses the painting and sculpture workshops, the graphic workshops, and the exhibitionrooms of the Academy, where the annual exhibitions of the graduates take place. Facing the Elba River, the building has engraved the names of: Pheidias, Iktinos, Praxiteles, Polykleitos, Lysippos, Erwin Von Steinbach, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael and Dürer on the wall and on the other side “DEM VATERLAND ZU ZIER UND EHR” – “For the Honor and Adornment of the Fatherland”. The Academy also has, in addition to a splendid main building, another building for sculpture located on Pfotenhauerstrasse, whose workshops date back to 1910. The workshops for the courses of Restoration and Costume Design, and the technical college degree course for Theatre Setting are located at Güntzstrasse in the buildings of the former Academy of Applied Arts. In 1764, the General Academy for Painting, Sculpture, Copperplate engraving and Architecture was founded by order of the electorate Friedrich Christian, belonging to the House of Fürstenberg from 1768 to 1786. Its first director was the French Charles Hutin. After the death of Hutin in 1776, Johann Eleazar Zeissig and Giovanni Battista Casanova were appointed alternating directors of the Academy. The Academy was the successor installation of the first “School for Drawing and Painters” founded in 1680. It was one of the oldest academies of art in the German-speaking area. In 1950, the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts was merged with the Public Academy of Applied Art, the successor of the Royal Saxon School of Applied Art founded in 1875/1876, into the Superior Dresden Academy of Fine Arts. Today, it belongs to the group of Superior Schools of Fine Arts in Germany, which with an unmistakable profile and with the best conditions, it is very attractive for a degree in the Fine Arts. Today, it belongs to the group of Superior Schools of Fine Arts in Germany, which with an unmistakable profile and with the best conditions, it is very attractive for a degree in the Fine Arts. Generous and well- equipped workshops are available for students. The possibilities for exhibitions at the Academy are excellent: with an octagon below the glass dome marking the view of the city, its lemon squeezer, and two large exhibition rooms adjacent to the former library, as well as the Brühl’s Terrace Gallery, provide the Academy with generous presentation surfaces which are available for all degree courses and co-operation partners. In 1990 a new implementation was provided, which offered the opportunity for an innovative and organic development of the Academy. Notable international artists from the world of art are teaching in the Academy. The diverse courses and artistic tendencies to study painting, graphic arts and sculpture are developed in a broad way. The classic cornerstones of artistic teaching at the Dresden Academy of Fine Arts are complemented through discourse and artistic exchange with the project “New media” and the specialization of interdisciplinary artistic works. These conditions allow for the optimal use of all the offers and possibilities. Virtual Reality (VR) Virtual reality images for virtual reality glasses viewing in mobile devices There are no limits to see the world: live the experience by yourself in virtual reality ! Join us ! Little Planet Photo Gallery Panoramic Photography How was this Virtual Tour made In nocturnal urban photography we find many different sources of light. There is the lighting of houses and buildings, the street lighting, the vehicles that circulate in the streets with their lights on, the illuminated signs that in some cases are very colorful. The diaphragm I use in these cases is f11. The reason is that the light projected by all these sources, appear with a titillating appearance that looks really pretty. If you use large apertures such as f2.8 or f4, the spotlights produce a huge flash that easily ruins the photograph. Likewise, the use of ultraviolet filter is not recommended, since it produces flashes known as “flares”, which cause unsightly and annoying beams of light in our images.
 
Visit the Royal Palace of Dresden to observe the Parade of the Princes(Fürstenzug); one of the longest and most symbolic works of art of the city. The Fuerstenzug (or the "Parade of the Princes") is a 102 meter (335 ft.) long mural composed of approximately 25,000 individual mosaics that holds the record for being the world's longest porcelain works of art. This enormous mural decorates an entire wall of the old royal palace and is considered the most important of its kind in Germany. The Fuerstenzug (or the "Parade of the Princes") is a 102 meter (335 ft.) long mural composed of approximately 25,000 individual mosaics that holds the record for being the world's longest porcelain works of art. When visiting the Fuerstenzug and seeing the detail and the measures that have been taken to conserve it, we discover the history of the Saxon royalty that is shown on the mural. The Fuerstenzug is located on the outer wall of the old stables of the palace, so you could see it without entering the palace. As you walk along the cobblestone floor of the Fuerstenzug (Augustusstrasse) the size of the mural can be appreciated. Although a mural on the wall of the stables already existed long before, it wasn’t until the end of the 19th century that WilhelmWalther was appointed to paint a representation of Saxony’s 35 rulers. You can find a self-portrait of the artist at the end of the parade. Walther included himself as the last of the 93 people whoappears on the mural. The mural managed to survive the destruction suffered by a large part of the city during the bombing of Dresden in 1945, and today is one of the city’s main landmarks to visit. Due to the rapid deterioration which the mural suffered by the end of the century, porcelain mosaics were placed instead of painting it to make sure that the image was preserved. The mural managed to survive the destruction suffered by a large part of the city during the bombing of Dresden in 1945, and today is one of the city’s main landmarks to visit. After seeing the entire mural, you may enter the royal palace to discover more historical works of art. Since its reconstruction at the end of World War II, the palace has become the Palace of Art and Science, and holds a large collection of coins, weapons, and paintings. You may visit the Fuerstenzug every day, and there is no fee to see the mural. To enjoy the best views of the mural, visit this landmark during the day. It is better to arrive by tram or truck to this historic site, since it is difficult to find parking on the street during these busy hours. Virtual Reality (VR) Virtual reality images for virtual reality glasses viewing in mobile devices There are no limits to see the world: live the experience by yourself in virtual reality ! Join us ! Little Planet Photo Gallery How this virtual tour was done To develop all my photographic reels from the most basic to the most advanced I only use Adobe Lightroom. This tool is very powerful and allows me to make all kinds of adjustments on my RAW files squeezing as much information as possible, recovering lights that seemed lost or raisingshadows when there seemed to be no information. With Lightroom you can adjust, but you cannot touch up a photograph like you can with Photoshop. It is true that you can alter reality, but you cannot add, remove, or transform elements. You can also adjust by zones thanks to its brushes and graduated and radial filters.