Buckingham Palace

Miguel Angel Victoria Fotógrafo

Buckingham Palace is the official residence of the Queen in London. It is also used for official ceremonies, State visits and sightseeing. It is famous for hosting a substantial part of the Royal Collection, an extraordinary selection of artistic works resulting from royal collecting.
The Palace, originally known as Buckingham House, was initially a petit hotel built for the first duke of Buckingham in 1703 and acquired by King George III in 1762 to make it a private residence. In the following 75 years it underwent a series of expansions directed by the architects John Nash and Edward Blore (1850), creating three wings forming an open central patio.
With the arrival of the throne of Queen Victoria of England, Buckingham Palace became the official residence of the monarchy.

During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries some reforms were made in the palace, like the one carried out in 1912 (in charge of Aston Webb) and which gave the palace its current main façade, including the balcony from where the royal family greets.
The original Georgian interior from the nineteenth century is still preserved; it is composed of bright plaster inlaid with blue and pink lapis lazuli.
Edward VII redecorated the palace adding a Belle Époque decoration in cream and golden tones.
Some reception rooms are decorated in a Chinese style with furniture from the royal pavilion of Brighton and Carlton house.
The palace has 775 rooms and the palace gardens are the largest private gardens in London.
The artificial lake was created in 1828 and it receives water from Lake Serpentine, the lake located in Hyde Park.

The first building built on the site the palace is now stands was Goring house, built in 1633 by Lord Goring. However, the house that constitutes the original foundation of the palace was built by the Duke of Buckingham in 1703.

The first building built on the site the palace is now stands was Goring house, built in 1633 by Lord Goring. However, the house that constitutes the original foundation of the palace was built by the Duke of Buckingham in 1703.
This house was designed by architect William Winde, building a large central block of three floors and two smaller annex buildings.
The house was sold by his son to King George III in 1762.
It was intended to use the building as a private residence for the royal family, particularly for Queen Charlotte.
Meanwhile, St. James Palace would be continued to be used as an official and ceremonial residence of the King.
In fact, current ambassadors are accredited to the “St. James court”, even if it is Buckingham where they present their credentials to the Queen.
Queen Charlotte died in 1818 and two years later her husband George III.
The heir, George IV decided to expand Buckingham to assign it with St. James to state acts, but in 1826 he decided to turn Buckingham Palace into a royal palace.
Two more wings were created leaving an open inner courtyard.
This is the structure that is maintained until today.
In that place was an impressive arch of triumph inspired by the Arch of Constantine of Rome, whose cost was $34.450 British pounds.
George IV wanted to crown it with an equestrian statue of him. However, the monarch died earlier and the Parliament decided to install his statue in Trafalgar Square.
Although kings celebrate acts and receptions in the Palace’s halls of State, they never resided in it, since they preferred Clarence House.
Most of the reception halls were furnished at that time and they are still in use today.
They use a Chinese style with furniture from the royal pavilion of Brighton and Carlton House.

With the arrival of Queen Victoria to the throne in 1837, Buckingham Palace went on to become a royal residence.
While the halls of State were characterized by the infinity colors, the needs of the new palace were less luxurious.

With the arrival of Queen Victoria to the throne in 1837, Buckingham Palace went on to become a royal residence.
While the halls of State were characterized by the infinity colors, the needs of the new palace were less luxurious.
The great east wing of the palace (currently the main façade of it) was built after Queen Victoria’s marriage.
In 1847, the couple found the palace too small for the life of the court and its growing family.
So it was decided to close the patio and turn it into an inner courtyard.
In this wing there is a balcony from which the royal family greets its subjects.
Since before Prince Albert’s death, Queen Victoria’s passion for music and dance was well known, so the great musicians of that time were taken into the palace to perform their works.
Mendelssohn performed on three occasions, Strauss and his orchestra performed in the palace when the composer’s play, “Alice Polka”, was released in honor of Princess Alicia.
During that time, the Palace of Buckingham was the stage of imposing dances, routine royal ceremonies, investitures and presentations.
After the death of her husband, Queen Victoria left Buckingham and moved to Windsor Castle.
The activity of the court continued to take place in Windsor Castle, and Buckingham was relegated to Queen Victoria’s shadow.
In 1901, King Edward VII arrived to the throne, bringing life into the palace.
The new king and his wife Queen Alexandra were the exponent of the British upper class and their group of friends, known as the group of Marlborough House, were considered the most eminent people of the time.
During World War I the Palace, at that time the residence of King George’s V and Queen Mary, was not bombed.
The objects of greater value from the Royal Collection were evacuated to Windsor but the royal family stayed in London.
On May 8, 1945 the Palace was the center of British celebrations, with the King, the Queen, Princess Elizabeth (future Queen), and Princess Margaret waving from the balcony, with shattered windows behind them.
During the present reign, the ceremonies of the court have undergone a radical change and the entrance to the palace is not reserved simply to the upper class.
The royal dresses of the court have been abolished.

Nowadays, most of the men invited to Buckingham wear a jacket for the day and at night, depending of the occasion they wear a black or white tie.
If the occasion is a white tie, women, if they have it, should wear a tiara even when there is no dress code established.

Nowadays, most of the men invited to Buckingham wear a jacket for the day and at night, depending of the occasion they wear a black or white tie.
If the occasion is a white tie, women, if they have it, should wear a tiara even when there is no dress code established.
One of the biggest changes occurred in 1958 when the Queen abolished the presentations to society.
In these presentations to society young aristocrats were presented to the monarchy.
They took place in the Throne Room.
The young ladies entered and bowed, and then they moved backwards performing a choreography with the tails of their dresses (which had a certain length) and repeated the reference before the Queen.
The ceremony was very pompous so the Queen decided to eliminate it since she considered it elitist and typical of antiquity.
They were replaced by garden parties, more frequent and to which a broader spectrum of the British society can go.
The Throne Room is currently used for special visits to the Queen as recently in her jubilee.
It is in this room where pictures are taken for royal weddings.
The investitures, which include the appointments of knights, with the traditional imposition of the sword, are held in the Victorian ballroom, built in 1854.
With dimensions of 37 by 20 meters, it is the largest room in the palace.
During the investitures, the Queen does not sit in the throne; she stands in front of the platform, under a large vaulted velvet pavilion called shamiana or baldachin used in the coronation of King George V as emperor in the Durbar of Delhi in 1911.
A military band performs at the musicians’ gallery while those who receive decorations approach the Queen and receive their honors, being seen by their families and friends.
The Beatles were the first artists not consecrated to receive honors.
Gala banquets also take place in the Ballroom.
These dinners take place the first night of stay of the visiting head of state.
On those occasions, there are more than 150 guests with white ties and women with tiaras. Dinner is served in gold crockery.
The largest and more formal reception that takes place in Buckingham Palace is in November, when the Queen receives the diplomatic corps residing in London.
On this occasion, all state rooms are used, since the royal family passes through them all, initiating a procession through the large north doors of the painting gallery.
Other smaller ceremonies take place in Room 1844.
Luncheons and some meetings are held there.
Other larger luncheons take place in the vaulted music room, or in the state dining room.
On all formal occasions employees wear special clothing.
Since the bombing of the chapel in World War II, family liturgical celebrations take place in the music room.
The Queen’s first three children were baptized there, in a special golden fountain.
Prince William was baptized in the same room but his brother was baptized in the Chapel of St. George of Windsor.
The biggest ceremonies of the year are the garden parties, where 9 thousand people gather to have tea and sandwiches.
Once the guests arrive, the national anthem sounds and the Queen comes out from the Arch room.
She passes through the guests greeting some previously selected ones and inviting them to a special area for tea.
If the guests are not lucky enough to have an encounter with the Queen, at least they have the satisfaction of admiring the gardens.

Little Planet

Palacio de Buckingham
Palacio de Buckingham

Photo Gallery

How was this Virtual Tour made

The equipment used to perform virtual tour are the following:

  • Nikon D810 DSLR Camera
  • Lens Sigma 8 mm Fisheye
  • Nodal Ninja NN4 Tripod Head
  • Manfrotto 190 Carbon Fiber Tripod
  • Remote Switch

The software processing of the image was

  • Lightroom to process RAW files
  • PTGui for stitching images
  • Photoshop general and local settings
  • PanoTour Pro for generating virtual tour

Would you like to use this virtual tour in your website?

Good news! Yes, you can use without asking for permission. Our site is licensed under "Creative Commons – Acknowledgement 4.0 International", This type of license allows you:

  • To Share- copy, distribute, execute and use the artwork publicly.
  • To Make derivative works.
  • To Use the artwork for commercial purposes.

This means that you must assign the credits of the work in the following way:

"Buckingham Palace, Fotografía (cc): Miguel Angel Victoria"

You need to copy the following code and paste the link in your website:

Licencia de Creative Commons
Buckingham Palace by Miguel Angel Victoria is licensed under Licencia Creative Commons Reconocimiento 4.0 Internacional . Created from the artwork retrieved from https://sinaloa360.s3.amazonaws.com/palacio-de-buckingham/index.html. You can find more permissions under this license in https://www.sinaloa360.com
Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Traducción al idioma inglés realizada por la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa a través del Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán. English language translation made by Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa through the collaboration of Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *