Prague Palace

Miguel Angel Victoria Fotógrafo

The Prague Palace is the most important national, cultural and historical monument, symbol of more than a thousand years of development from the Czech State.
It’s a monumental set of places, fortifications and religious buildings that reflect all architectural styles.
It’s been the residence of the princes, kings and emperors of Bohemia also residence of presidents from the constitution of the republic in 1918.

In 1962 the Prague Palace with its archaeological finds was declared a national cultural heritage.

In 1962 the Prague Palace with its archaeological finds was declared a national cultural heritage.
The origins of the Prague Palace are linked to Bořivoj, the first prince Premyslida historically documented.
In the 80s of the ninth century Bořivoj moved his residence to a promontory on the Vltava.
The first palace built for princes were made of wood.
The first stone building and the oldest Christian Sanctuary was the Church of Our Lady.
The church of Bořivoj was shortly afterwards remodeled by Prince Spytihněv I who was buried in it in 915.
The second church in the area of ​​the Castle was the Basilica of St. George, founded by Prince Vratislav I.
In the 20s of the tenth century, Prince Wenceslaus ordered the construction of a third temple within walking distance of the basilica – the San Vito roundabout.
Remodeled in the 11th century by Prince Spytihněv II in a monumental basilica.
In the year 973, when the bishopric of Prague was established, the Prague Castle was also the residence of the Bishop of Prague.
From this time, dates the first convent in Bohemia, established next to the Basilica of St. George.
In the 10th century the Castle occupied an area of ​​around 6 hectares. In the Romanesque period the old fortress town was changed into a sturdy medieval castle.
In 1135 Soběslav I built a stone palace for the princes and new stone fortifications reinforced with several towers.

The Gothic period impacted on the appearance of the Prague Castle, first of all by Charles IV (1346 – 1378) who got the Pope to raise the bishopric of Prague to archbishopric.

The Gothic period impacted on the appearance of the Prague Castle, first of all by Charles IV (1346 – 1378) who got the Pope to raise the bishopric of Prague to archbishopric.
In the time of Charles IV, the castle became an imperial residence for the first time.
Carlos IV reinforced the Castle and remodeled the Royal Palace with the Chapel of All Saints.
He had the roofs of the towers covered with gilded metal plates that gave rise to the phrase Prague Golden City.
From 1382 the Bohemian monarchs stopped living in Prague Castle for over one hundred years.
The royal court was moved to the area of ​​the Municipal House and returned to Prague Castle in 1483.
The monarch ordered reconstruction of the Castle of Prague in gothic style directed by Benedikt Ried.
He built the impressive Vladislav Hall, with which the first Renaissance features are introduced in Prague.
In its time the Gothic style began to give way to the new architectural style, the Renaissance.
The impact of Italian art was most evident in Prague under the reign of Ferdinand I of Habsburg.
At that time the medieval castle was transformed into a comfortable Renaissance palace with gardens.
In the Royal Garden on the north side emerged the typical Italian architecture of the Royal Summer Palace.
The fire of 1541 that affected the buildings of the Castle motivated the construction activities.
As part of the renovation, both residential spaces and religious buildings were remodeled.
In those days of the first Habsburgs, the first noble palaces appeared in the Castle area.
The stables for the buildings were built on the northwest side.

During the kingdom of Rodolfo II (1576 – 1611) the Renaissance and Mannerist reconstruction of the Castle culminated, which became for the second time an imperial center and above all a cultural and scientific center from Europe.

During the kingdom of Rodolfo II (1576 – 1611) the Renaissance and Mannerist reconstruction of the Castle culminated, which became for the second time an imperial center and above all a cultural and scientific center of Europe.
New buildings were built in the Second Courtyard to house Rodolfo’s collections – the Salón Nuevo (now the Salón Español) and the Galería Rodolfo.
The northwest and southwest sides of the castle were connected by a side where the famous Kunstkammer and other spaces for the collecting activities of Rodolfo were located, who also built new stables for his precious purebred Spanish horses.
In that time , the base of the Callejón de Oro was placed. The Powder Tower on the Jelení příkop moat is mentioned as the place where the laboratories of Rodolfo’s alchemists were located.
The castle suffered serious damage once it was taken and plundered by the Saxon army in 1631 and by the Swedes in 1648.
After the Thirty Years’ War the Habsburgs did not show much interest in the royal residence.
Only between 1755 and 1775 did Maria Teresa commission an extensive reconstruction of Prague Castle, making it a representative palatial complex.
The imposing construction work was caused by the damages that the Castle suffered due to intense bombings during the wars at the beginning of his kingdom.
The renovation was designed by the Viennese architect Nicolo Pacassi, who also designed the First Patio with its monumental entrance door.
The Chapel of the Holy Cross in the Second Courtyard and other buildings, for example the Chapter of Noble Ladies, also date from the time of the Teresian reconstruction.
Pacassi endowed the south wing of the Castle with the unified and majestic facade of a representative building in late Baroque style.
His projects influenced by Viennese Rococo and French classicism were made by the builders Anselmo Lurago, Antonín Kunz and Antonín Haffenecker.
The nineteenth century was a period of neglect.
After the reforms of Joseph II many of the buildings of the Castle were used by the army.
Some buildings were remodeled due to the stay of Fernando I the Good in the 60s.
It began with the reconstruction and under the direction of the architect Josef Mocker finalized the works of the Cathedral of San Vito in 1929.

Between 1920 and 1935, the castle was restored as residence for the Czechoslovak president, by the Slovenian architect Josip Plecnik.

Between 1920 and 1935, the castle was restored as residence for the Czechoslovak president, by the Slovenian architect Josip Plecnik.
Its modifications affected the gardens south of the Castle and the Fourth Courtyard with the Baluarte Garden. Plecnik created the Hall of Columns and the private areas of the presidential apartment, including the so-called Masaryk Office.
After the Second World War, Otto Rothmayer finished some interior spaces of the Castle with a level of quality of similar design.
In 1936 Pavel Janák was appointed the architect of Prague Castle, followed by Jaroslav Fragner in 1956.
After 1989 many areas of the Castle were open to the public.
In the times of President Václav Havel several modifications were made inside the Castle.
The passage through the fence of the Puente de la Pólvora (architect Josef Pleskot) was awarded with an important architectural prize.
The modern greenhouse designed by the world-renowned architect Eva Jiricná is also of great interest.
The Plaza San Jorge was remodeled and repaved.
In collaboration with experts from the Getty Institute, the mosaic of the Last Judgment was also restored.
From 1990 the Prague Castle is illuminated every day from dusk to midnight.
The lighting goes back to the year 1928 when the first lamps were installed to mark the tenth anniversary of the constitution of the republic.
A decorative lighting was inaugurated at the end of the 60’s but it worked only in important dates of the republic.

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Palacio de Praga
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How was this Virtual Tour made

The equipment used to perform virtual tour are the following:

  • Nikon D810 DSLR Camera
  • Lens Sigma 8 mm Fisheye
  • Nodal Ninja NN4 Tripod Head
  • Manfrotto 190 Carbon Fiber Tripod
  • Remote Switch

The software processing of the image was

  • Lightroom to process RAW files
  • PTGui for stitching images
  • Photoshop general and local settings
  • PanoTour Pro for generating virtual tour

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Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

Traducción al idioma inglés realizada por la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa a través del Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán. English language translation made by Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa through the collaboration of Centro de Estudio de Idiomas Culiacán

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