San Ignacio de Piaxtla was part of the five main mayorships in which Sinaloa was divided. Remaining inside the San José de Cópala authority, along with the towns that currently belong to the municipality. Which are: Santa Apolonia, Ajoya, San Agustín, San Juan, Cabazán and San Javier.

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Know by Virtual Reality the municipality of San Ignacio

In 1732, with the establishment of the sole governorate of Sonora and Sinaloa, the territory is divided into five provinces. Two in Sonora and three in Sinaloa. The Province of Sinaloa, from the Mayo River to the Mocorito River. The Province of Culiacan, from the Mocorito River to the Elota River; and the Province of Rosario, which had the Cañas River as its boundary, and it is the one San Ignacio belong to.

Iglesia de San Ignacio de Loyola

Don Héctor R. Olea mentions that the toponymy of San Ignacio de Piaxtla means “place that has Saint Ignatius of Loyola as patron saint”

During the years following 1786, in which the intendances system was implanted, the demarcation of the region of the Piaxtla River was not altered. 

The departments belonging to Sinaloa were those of El Fuerte, formed by the parties of Alamos, Sinaloa and that of its name. The department of Culiacan, integrated with the party of its name and the party of Cosala. And the department of San Sebastian, formed by the party of its name, the party of Rosario and the party of San Ignacio de Piaxtla.

Ayuntamiento de San Ignacio

During the years following 1786, in which the intendances system was implanted, the demarcation of the region of the Piaxtla River was not altered. 

Once the definitive separation of Sonora and Sinaloa into two federal states was decreed, the first local constitution issued in 1831 established the new division in the state, now composed by eleven districts.

The municipality of San Ignacio was created,

The San Ignacio district disappears in 1852 to join the Cosalá district, remaining as a party. But from 1861, with the new internal division of the state, it returns to be constituted as a district. Four municipalities formed the district of San Ignacio in 1870: the municipal head, San Juan, San Javier and Coyotitan, with their respective rural settlements. 

Plazuela de San Ignacio

Once the definitive separation of Sonora and Sinaloa into two federal states was decreed, the first local constitution issued in 1831 established the new division in the state, now composed by eleven districts.

In 1915, the municipality of San Ignacio was created, and its category was approved in the Constitution which, adopts the division of states into municipalities.

The devil’s chapel in San Ignacio

The municipality of San Ignacio has an endless number of legends. Some are true and the others are stories that people have been creating over time. One of the biggest attractions that catches the attention of visitors is the “Devil’s chapel”, where the remains of Bernardo Escobosa are resting.

San Ignacio

In 1870 four municipalities formed the district of San Ignacio: the municipal head, San Juan, San Javier and Coyotitan, with their respective rural settlements. 

The people who visit San Ignacio for the first time wonder with astonishment about the history of this chapel. Although nobody knows the history of it, they talk about what they have heard through their ancestors.

Without a doubt, one of the most famous stories is the one of Bernardo Escobosa’s arrival to San Ignacio in 1840 from Spain, bringing with him various haberdasheries, fabrics, mirrors, perfumes, and other articles, which he started commercializing among the inhabitants with the desire of becoming San Ignacio’s most rich and powerful man. 

San Ignacio

This one can be dominated in all its splendor once you arrive at the municipal head.

His greed was so big, that he decided to sell his soul to the devil. His wish wash fulfilled and he became the most thriving merchant of the municipality. This led him to have enormous properties and extensions of land. 

Finally, when he died, according to the legend, his relatives took him to the cemetery to bury when a strong wind snatched the coffin and placed it on the hill where the chapel is located, where he then was buried.

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How this Virtual Tour was made

At the end of February, a group of friends visited San Ignacio, one of the most beautiful municipalities of Sinaloa. We arrived very early at the house of Professor Eduwiges Vega Padilla. There were already a lot of people waiting for Dr. Efraín Romo Santos to give them a sight examination. 

Dr. Efrain Romo

We arrived very early at the house of Professor Eduwiges Vega Padilla. There were already a lot of people waiting for Dr. Efraín Romo Santos to give them a sight examination

My wife and I went to take pictures guided by my friend Guillermo Vega Aguilar throughout the municipality head. Capturing images of some places of interest like the Church, the town square, the Municipal Palace, Cristo de la Mesa. It was an unforgettable day where we enjoyed the hospitality of the inhabitants of this beautiful corner of our estate. We hope to return soon and make another virtual tour.

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Logotipo de la Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa

English language translation made by Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa through the collaboration of Centro de Estudio de Idiomas

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